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Category Archives: chickens

Cause and Effect

Last Wednesday afternoon, one of our roosters attacked me.

Last Wednesday evening, we ate him for dinner.

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A Question for Foghorn (a poem)

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Oh, dear rooster

Why must you

C   R   O   W

so insistently

so repeatedly

at 2:30 in the morning?

Sad Sally

On a cold day a couple of weeks ago, Husband said we had a sick chicken. She was standing in one place and moving very little. She was not following the other chickens around. She wasn’t eating or drinking. She wouldn’t even eat meal worms, which is like crack for chickens, so we knew something was wrong. Husband said she seemed despondent.

Since we wanted to make sure she didn’t infect the other chickens with whatever she had, Husband put Sad Sally in her own little cage in the rabbit barn. There is a heat lamp in there, and she seemed to perk up and begin drinking water. Finally, she stepped out of her cage and Husband thought perhaps she was on the road to recovery. He placed her back with the rest of the flock.

Perhaps it was too soon, or maybe she just was never going to make it, but a few days later, Sad Sally was dead.

We think perhaps she just got too cold and wasn’t hardy enough to survive her first winter.

This week, the forecast shows even colder temperatures than what made Sad Sally suffer. Wind chills below zero had us a little concerned. There is a large door-sized window in our coop, and we thought we’d better do something about that to make sure the rest of the chickens don’t get too cold. I had an old shower curtain, and this morning we stapled it over the opening. However, I hadn’t considered that the cold temperature would make the plastic brittle, so the staples were tearing the plastic. Clever Husband put staples in the top where the plastic is reinforced, and folded the sides over to help make it stronger. It’s better than nothing, but if the winds are really strong, the plastic may tear loose anyway.

We still have the plank of wood we had cut out of the shed to make the door, so we carried it to the window and rested it against the opening. It should block some of the wind, at least, holding the plastic in place, and hopefully it will be enough to avoid more sad chickens.

And next time we build a chicken coop, we’ll keep these weather concerns in mind, perhaps by having an actual storm door.

We’re always learning something on our little farm.

In Admiration of a Rooster

Written by The Husband

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This fellow is truly inspiring. He guards his hens with dignity — pecks them into the hen house if he spies a hawk and makes an awful fuss if he senses one of them is in trouble. He works through his fear by sidling up to danger and keeping the corner of his eye on you. He is the great, white, kingly Foghorn.

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Planning a Transformation

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Y’all remember our gross pool?

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With all the thistles in the summer?

Well, we hope to do something about that next spring and summer.  Our hope is to cover the pool with a deck or something.  We’re not sure we want to fill it in, because someday we may want to use it.  But right now, it’s all just an eyesore.

If we cover it, the area becomes usable space for chairs or tables.  We’d like to take down the fence and get rid of all the weeds.

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We’ve got a chicken yard on one side of the poultry barn, and we’ll probably add another on the other side as we increase our flock.  So part of the north side of the fence may remain as part of the chicken fence.  But we’re hoping the rest will come down; it would really open up the sight-lines on the property.

Maybe someday we’ll have a pool.  But for now, we’d like to enjoy as much of our property as we can.

Autumn on the Little Farm

Well, howdy.

It’s been a while.

School started and swept me away from pretty much everything else. I’ve been busy, but I’ll let you know what’s been happening.

The chickens are getting big! We’re getting about three eggs a day, though at least one of those eggs is still very small – more like a quail egg than a chicken egg. But we’re just about to the point where supply is keeping up with demand. Now that the days are shorter, we need to get a light with a timer inside the chicken house so that the girls will keep laying through the winter. (If we’re feeding them, we expect them to keep feeding us!)

eggs

We currently have five rabbits: Bear, a buck who is getting old and may be just about past his usefulness; Brownie, a young buck whom we hope is virile; Licorice, an older doe who seems a bit lethargic lately, but who is still a good mother; and Fawn and Chocolate Chip, two young does whom we hope to breed as soon as they are old enough. Licorice is due late next week, and we’re hoping for a good litter of kits.

Our front yard, which I have taken to calling the meadow, never got mowed this year. (Last year, someone came and mowed it for the hay.) We’ve been lamenting how all that grass is just going to waste because we didn’t have a way to bale it. And then my amazing husband went to YouTube University and built his own baler! Now we can mow the meadow and bale it for use for the chickens and rabbits. It’s late in the season this year, but we’ve managed to get about half a dozen bales made. Next year, I’ll mow it earlier and we’ll bale a lot more. (In fact, we may be able to get two cuttings out of it if I plan it well.)

hay

Husband is planning the house building project. He made a model of the house and he’s scouting out trees in the woods to fell and cut for timber. He’s looking at attending an advanced timber framing workshop in June (he attended the basic workshop this past June). The internet browser is crowded with tabs of various tools he wants.

house model

Autumn on the little farm is lovely. The woods is just beginning to turn orange and the dry leaves rustle in the wind. Days are warm, but nights are chilly and cozy under the blankets. I spent part of today collecting kindling from the yard so we’ll have plenty for our fires this winter.

I’ve put away the summer clothes and pulled out fall and winter gear. We’re keeping wood stacked close to the house, and in all ways getting ready for the cold weather. I hope we’ll be able to keep ourselves and our animals snug in the coming months.

Chicken Yard

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The chickens needed a little more space to move around, so we built a little chicken yard for them.

chickenfencecoverWe covered it to protect the chickens from hawks, racoons, cats, and other predators.

chickenfenceIt took them a while to figure it out, but Husband made a trail of food for them, and they finally came out.

Happy chickens!